Giorgio Marconi began his career as a gallerist in 1965, abandoning his medical studies and deciding instead to open his first exhibition space, Studio Marconi at via Tadino 15, which replaced his father Egisto’s frame-making workshop. Thanks to his father, a frame-maker to the major Italian artists of the 1930s, Giorgio Marconi met many artists, among them Valerio Adami, Enrico Baj, Lucio Del Pezzo, Arnaldo and Giò Pomodoro and Emilio Tadini. Frequent travelling, especially to London, saw him forge important relationships, such as with the famous art dealer Robert Fraser, and with the English Pop Art artists Peter Blake, Patrick Caulfield, Richard Hamilton, David Hockney, Eduardo Paolozzi and Joe Tilson. Studio Marconi quickly became an important reference point in the cultural life of Milan by promoting the work of young artists and holding national and international exhibitions of well-established artists, including Joseph Beuys, Alberto Burri, Alexander Calder, Willem De Kooning, Lucio Fontana, Joan Miró, Francis Picabia and Antoni Tápies. Widening his scope beyond simply exhibiting artworks, Marconi collaborated from the outset with prominent scholars, critics and journalists (including Giulio Carlo Argan, Natalia Aspesi, Giorgio Bocca, Gillo Dorfles and Umberto Eco) in order to produce periodic publications, the forerunners of today’s art magazines, and to focus on the current state of the art world. Thus Studio Marconi came to have more in common with a museum space than with a private gallery. Giorgio Marconi established firm friendships with many major artists debuting in Milan, among them Man Ray (1967) and Louise Nevelson (1973), for whom he curated and promoted numerous exhibitions in Italy and abroad. When Studio Marconi closed in 1992, the gallery had held more than 180 exhibitions. In 2004 Giorgio Marconi established the Marconi Foundation with the aim of continuing to work with his artists, to manage their artworks, to collaborate with institutions and to promote important exhibitions in Italy and abroad.
Exhibitions
1989-1979
1979-1969
1969-1965
Menuhistory
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GióMARCONI